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23-Oct-2017 21:03

Okay, before we launch into this, here’s one more fact that you need to know: Home values historically keep pace with inflation. When people say, “my home increased in value,” they’re really saying, “yay, inflation rose! Listen to Nobel-Prize winning Yale economist Robert Shiller, who gained public notoriety for predicting the Great Recession. Through this, Shiller made a few observations: As you can see, housing prices (adjusted for inflation) typically stay within a narrow range — around 100-120 on that chart. The first was triggered by the austerity of World War I, ending with post-WWII prosperity. Here’s an illustrative example of one situation in which the buy vs. Please DO NOT pitch a fit in the comments about because this tells me you missed the point. The question, then, is: Where is that crossover point? The solution comes from running scenarios based on a massive variety of factors, including the price-to-rent ratio in your area (we’ll dive into that concept later in this article), prevailing interest rates, tax brackets, utility costs, HOA fees, alternative investment opportunities and a long list of other factors. That’s why every person should crunch the numbers based on their own personal situation. This is exactly what people talk about when they make the argument that “buying is better than renting because you build equity.” She missed the opportunity for equity gains from three sources: (1) Principal contributions (2) Renovations and upgrades (3) Market growth We’ll talk about these later in this article.

As early as 2005, Shiller started issuing warnings about an impending drop in real estate prices that could be as severe as 40 percent. The second was the rampant housing boom that started in 1997. Sure, some people who bought at the bottom of the market in 2009 are now sipping champagne on the French Riviera. Kinda.) Home prices in many parts of the nation have doubled since the 2008-2009 lows. The point = crunch the numbers using the specifics of your personal situation, instead of making a six-figure decision based on an oversimplified cliche. If you don’t like the numbers in the example below, re-run the scenario using your own numbers. Owen, however, paid equal opportunity costs by missing out on the chance to invest 0,000 into an index fund. I’m going to repeat this one more time for emphasis, because it’s so crucial: Tying up your cash in a nonperforming or weak-performing asset carries a giant freakin’ opportunity cost. Tying up your cash in a nonperforming or weak-performing asset … [Quick tangent: Many real estate investors cite this to support “no-money-down,” high-leverage strategies.

(Somebody please take the thesaurus away from me.) Let’s chat about the “should I rent or buy? Mortgages are Your mortgage payment comes to

Okay, before we launch into this, here’s one more fact that you need to know: Home values historically keep pace with inflation. When people say, “my home increased in value,” they’re really saying, “yay, inflation rose! Listen to Nobel-Prize winning Yale economist Robert Shiller, who gained public notoriety for predicting the Great Recession. Through this, Shiller made a few observations: As you can see, housing prices (adjusted for inflation) typically stay within a narrow range — around 100-120 on that chart. The first was triggered by the austerity of World War I, ending with post-WWII prosperity. Here’s an illustrative example of one situation in which the buy vs. Please DO NOT pitch a fit in the comments about because this tells me you missed the point. The question, then, is: Where is that crossover point? The solution comes from running scenarios based on a massive variety of factors, including the price-to-rent ratio in your area (we’ll dive into that concept later in this article), prevailing interest rates, tax brackets, utility costs, HOA fees, alternative investment opportunities and a long list of other factors. That’s why every person should crunch the numbers based on their own personal situation. This is exactly what people talk about when they make the argument that “buying is better than renting because you build equity.” She missed the opportunity for equity gains from three sources: (1) Principal contributions (2) Renovations and upgrades (3) Market growth We’ll talk about these later in this article.As early as 2005, Shiller started issuing warnings about an impending drop in real estate prices that could be as severe as 40 percent. The second was the rampant housing boom that started in 1997. Sure, some people who bought at the bottom of the market in 2009 are now sipping champagne on the French Riviera. Kinda.) Home prices in many parts of the nation have doubled since the 2008-2009 lows. The point = crunch the numbers using the specifics of your personal situation, instead of making a six-figure decision based on an oversimplified cliche. If you don’t like the numbers in the example below, re-run the scenario using your own numbers. Owen, however, paid equal opportunity costs by missing out on the chance to invest $100,000 into an index fund. I’m going to repeat this one more time for emphasis, because it’s so crucial: Tying up your cash in a nonperforming or weak-performing asset carries a giant freakin’ opportunity cost. Tying up your cash in a nonperforming or weak-performing asset … [Quick tangent: Many real estate investors cite this to support “no-money-down,” high-leverage strategies. (Somebody please take the thesaurus away from me.) Let’s chat about the “should I rent or buy? Mortgages are Your mortgage payment comes to $1,448.64 per month. [Thanks to my friend Todd Tresidder at the blog Financial Mentor for this awesome amortization calculator.Here are three popular arguments defending the “renting is throwing money away” myth. You’re not building $1,448 in equity with each payment. After 13 payments, you’ll pay almost $15,000 in interest, taxes and insurance.We talked about this at length earlier, so let’s move on to two other types of equity gains. But the other $10,000 came from , which is the result of knowledgeable, skilled management. And the next time you catch yourself thinking the same thing (because we’re social creatures who internalize pop-mythology), come back and re-read this.Forced appreciation comes from choosing the right property and managing it correctly. Talented investors don’t sit around, hoping that the market might rise in value. They spend $X to remodel a home, create a value that’s greater than $X, and pocket the spread — either through higher rental income or via sales. Back to the original argument: “Renters don’t benefit from rising home values. What conclusions can we reach at the end of all of this? There’s no such thing as “throwing money away on rent” — not any more than you’re also throwing money away on cleaning gutters, paying property taxes, and for that matter, buying socks.During that first 13-19 years of your mortgage, you’re buried deep in the ITI sandbox.You’ll spend the final decade of your mortgage building far more equity than you did during the first two decades. Key Takeaway: You’re not building much equity, especially during the first decade-and-a-half.

||

Okay, before we launch into this, here’s one more fact that you need to know: Home values historically keep pace with inflation. When people say, “my home increased in value,” they’re really saying, “yay, inflation rose! Listen to Nobel-Prize winning Yale economist Robert Shiller, who gained public notoriety for predicting the Great Recession. Through this, Shiller made a few observations: As you can see, housing prices (adjusted for inflation) typically stay within a narrow range — around 100-120 on that chart. The first was triggered by the austerity of World War I, ending with post-WWII prosperity. Here’s an illustrative example of one situation in which the buy vs. Please DO NOT pitch a fit in the comments about because this tells me you missed the point. The question, then, is: Where is that crossover point? The solution comes from running scenarios based on a massive variety of factors, including the price-to-rent ratio in your area (we’ll dive into that concept later in this article), prevailing interest rates, tax brackets, utility costs, HOA fees, alternative investment opportunities and a long list of other factors. That’s why every person should crunch the numbers based on their own personal situation. This is exactly what people talk about when they make the argument that “buying is better than renting because you build equity.” She missed the opportunity for equity gains from three sources: (1) Principal contributions (2) Renovations and upgrades (3) Market growth We’ll talk about these later in this article.

As early as 2005, Shiller started issuing warnings about an impending drop in real estate prices that could be as severe as 40 percent. The second was the rampant housing boom that started in 1997. Sure, some people who bought at the bottom of the market in 2009 are now sipping champagne on the French Riviera. Kinda.) Home prices in many parts of the nation have doubled since the 2008-2009 lows. The point = crunch the numbers using the specifics of your personal situation, instead of making a six-figure decision based on an oversimplified cliche. If you don’t like the numbers in the example below, re-run the scenario using your own numbers. Owen, however, paid equal opportunity costs by missing out on the chance to invest $100,000 into an index fund. I’m going to repeat this one more time for emphasis, because it’s so crucial: Tying up your cash in a nonperforming or weak-performing asset carries a giant freakin’ opportunity cost. Tying up your cash in a nonperforming or weak-performing asset … [Quick tangent: Many real estate investors cite this to support “no-money-down,” high-leverage strategies.

(Somebody please take the thesaurus away from me.) Let’s chat about the “should I rent or buy? Mortgages are Your mortgage payment comes to $1,448.64 per month. [Thanks to my friend Todd Tresidder at the blog Financial Mentor for this awesome amortization calculator.

Here are three popular arguments defending the “renting is throwing money away” myth. You’re not building $1,448 in equity with each payment. After 13 payments, you’ll pay almost $15,000 in interest, taxes and insurance.

We talked about this at length earlier, so let’s move on to two other types of equity gains. But the other $10,000 came from , which is the result of knowledgeable, skilled management. And the next time you catch yourself thinking the same thing (because we’re social creatures who internalize pop-mythology), come back and re-read this.

Forced appreciation comes from choosing the right property and managing it correctly. Talented investors don’t sit around, hoping that the market might rise in value. They spend $X to remodel a home, create a value that’s greater than $X, and pocket the spread — either through higher rental income or via sales. Back to the original argument: “Renters don’t benefit from rising home values. What conclusions can we reach at the end of all of this? There’s no such thing as “throwing money away on rent” — not any more than you’re also throwing money away on cleaning gutters, paying property taxes, and for that matter, buying socks.

During that first 13-19 years of your mortgage, you’re buried deep in the ITI sandbox.

You’ll spend the final decade of your mortgage building far more equity than you did during the first two decades. Key Takeaway: You’re not building much equity, especially during the first decade-and-a-half.

,448.64 per month. [Thanks to my friend Todd Tresidder at the blog Financial Mentor for this awesome amortization calculator.

Here are three popular arguments defending the “renting is throwing money away” myth. You’re not building

Okay, before we launch into this, here’s one more fact that you need to know: Home values historically keep pace with inflation. When people say, “my home increased in value,” they’re really saying, “yay, inflation rose! Listen to Nobel-Prize winning Yale economist Robert Shiller, who gained public notoriety for predicting the Great Recession. Through this, Shiller made a few observations: As you can see, housing prices (adjusted for inflation) typically stay within a narrow range — around 100-120 on that chart. The first was triggered by the austerity of World War I, ending with post-WWII prosperity. Here’s an illustrative example of one situation in which the buy vs. Please DO NOT pitch a fit in the comments about because this tells me you missed the point. The question, then, is: Where is that crossover point? The solution comes from running scenarios based on a massive variety of factors, including the price-to-rent ratio in your area (we’ll dive into that concept later in this article), prevailing interest rates, tax brackets, utility costs, HOA fees, alternative investment opportunities and a long list of other factors. That’s why every person should crunch the numbers based on their own personal situation. This is exactly what people talk about when they make the argument that “buying is better than renting because you build equity.” She missed the opportunity for equity gains from three sources: (1) Principal contributions (2) Renovations and upgrades (3) Market growth We’ll talk about these later in this article.As early as 2005, Shiller started issuing warnings about an impending drop in real estate prices that could be as severe as 40 percent. The second was the rampant housing boom that started in 1997. Sure, some people who bought at the bottom of the market in 2009 are now sipping champagne on the French Riviera. Kinda.) Home prices in many parts of the nation have doubled since the 2008-2009 lows. The point = crunch the numbers using the specifics of your personal situation, instead of making a six-figure decision based on an oversimplified cliche. If you don’t like the numbers in the example below, re-run the scenario using your own numbers. Owen, however, paid equal opportunity costs by missing out on the chance to invest $100,000 into an index fund. I’m going to repeat this one more time for emphasis, because it’s so crucial: Tying up your cash in a nonperforming or weak-performing asset carries a giant freakin’ opportunity cost. Tying up your cash in a nonperforming or weak-performing asset … [Quick tangent: Many real estate investors cite this to support “no-money-down,” high-leverage strategies. (Somebody please take the thesaurus away from me.) Let’s chat about the “should I rent or buy? Mortgages are Your mortgage payment comes to $1,448.64 per month. [Thanks to my friend Todd Tresidder at the blog Financial Mentor for this awesome amortization calculator.Here are three popular arguments defending the “renting is throwing money away” myth. You’re not building $1,448 in equity with each payment. After 13 payments, you’ll pay almost $15,000 in interest, taxes and insurance.We talked about this at length earlier, so let’s move on to two other types of equity gains. But the other $10,000 came from , which is the result of knowledgeable, skilled management. And the next time you catch yourself thinking the same thing (because we’re social creatures who internalize pop-mythology), come back and re-read this.Forced appreciation comes from choosing the right property and managing it correctly. Talented investors don’t sit around, hoping that the market might rise in value. They spend $X to remodel a home, create a value that’s greater than $X, and pocket the spread — either through higher rental income or via sales. Back to the original argument: “Renters don’t benefit from rising home values. What conclusions can we reach at the end of all of this? There’s no such thing as “throwing money away on rent” — not any more than you’re also throwing money away on cleaning gutters, paying property taxes, and for that matter, buying socks.During that first 13-19 years of your mortgage, you’re buried deep in the ITI sandbox.You’ll spend the final decade of your mortgage building far more equity than you did during the first two decades. Key Takeaway: You’re not building much equity, especially during the first decade-and-a-half.

||

Okay, before we launch into this, here’s one more fact that you need to know: Home values historically keep pace with inflation. When people say, “my home increased in value,” they’re really saying, “yay, inflation rose! Listen to Nobel-Prize winning Yale economist Robert Shiller, who gained public notoriety for predicting the Great Recession. Through this, Shiller made a few observations: As you can see, housing prices (adjusted for inflation) typically stay within a narrow range — around 100-120 on that chart. The first was triggered by the austerity of World War I, ending with post-WWII prosperity. Here’s an illustrative example of one situation in which the buy vs. Please DO NOT pitch a fit in the comments about because this tells me you missed the point. The question, then, is: Where is that crossover point? The solution comes from running scenarios based on a massive variety of factors, including the price-to-rent ratio in your area (we’ll dive into that concept later in this article), prevailing interest rates, tax brackets, utility costs, HOA fees, alternative investment opportunities and a long list of other factors. That’s why every person should crunch the numbers based on their own personal situation. This is exactly what people talk about when they make the argument that “buying is better than renting because you build equity.” She missed the opportunity for equity gains from three sources: (1) Principal contributions (2) Renovations and upgrades (3) Market growth We’ll talk about these later in this article.

As early as 2005, Shiller started issuing warnings about an impending drop in real estate prices that could be as severe as 40 percent. The second was the rampant housing boom that started in 1997. Sure, some people who bought at the bottom of the market in 2009 are now sipping champagne on the French Riviera. Kinda.) Home prices in many parts of the nation have doubled since the 2008-2009 lows. The point = crunch the numbers using the specifics of your personal situation, instead of making a six-figure decision based on an oversimplified cliche. If you don’t like the numbers in the example below, re-run the scenario using your own numbers. Owen, however, paid equal opportunity costs by missing out on the chance to invest $100,000 into an index fund. I’m going to repeat this one more time for emphasis, because it’s so crucial: Tying up your cash in a nonperforming or weak-performing asset carries a giant freakin’ opportunity cost. Tying up your cash in a nonperforming or weak-performing asset … [Quick tangent: Many real estate investors cite this to support “no-money-down,” high-leverage strategies.

(Somebody please take the thesaurus away from me.) Let’s chat about the “should I rent or buy? Mortgages are Your mortgage payment comes to $1,448.64 per month. [Thanks to my friend Todd Tresidder at the blog Financial Mentor for this awesome amortization calculator.

Here are three popular arguments defending the “renting is throwing money away” myth. You’re not building $1,448 in equity with each payment. After 13 payments, you’ll pay almost $15,000 in interest, taxes and insurance.

We talked about this at length earlier, so let’s move on to two other types of equity gains. But the other $10,000 came from , which is the result of knowledgeable, skilled management. And the next time you catch yourself thinking the same thing (because we’re social creatures who internalize pop-mythology), come back and re-read this.

Forced appreciation comes from choosing the right property and managing it correctly. Talented investors don’t sit around, hoping that the market might rise in value. They spend $X to remodel a home, create a value that’s greater than $X, and pocket the spread — either through higher rental income or via sales. Back to the original argument: “Renters don’t benefit from rising home values. What conclusions can we reach at the end of all of this? There’s no such thing as “throwing money away on rent” — not any more than you’re also throwing money away on cleaning gutters, paying property taxes, and for that matter, buying socks.

During that first 13-19 years of your mortgage, you’re buried deep in the ITI sandbox.

You’ll spend the final decade of your mortgage building far more equity than you did during the first two decades. Key Takeaway: You’re not building much equity, especially during the first decade-and-a-half.

,448 in equity with each payment. After 13 payments, you’ll pay almost ,000 in interest, taxes and insurance.

We talked about this at length earlier, so let’s move on to two other types of equity gains. But the other ,000 came from , which is the result of knowledgeable, skilled management. And the next time you catch yourself thinking the same thing (because we’re social creatures who internalize pop-mythology), come back and re-read this.

Forced appreciation comes from choosing the right property and managing it correctly. Talented investors don’t sit around, hoping that the market might rise in value. They spend $X to remodel a home, create a value that’s greater than $X, and pocket the spread — either through higher rental income or via sales. Back to the original argument: “Renters don’t benefit from rising home values. What conclusions can we reach at the end of all of this? There’s no such thing as “throwing money away on rent” — not any more than you’re also throwing money away on cleaning gutters, paying property taxes, and for that matter, buying socks.

During that first 13-19 years of your mortgage, you’re buried deep in the ITI sandbox.

You’ll spend the final decade of your mortgage building far more equity than you did during the first two decades. Key Takeaway: You’re not building much equity, especially during the first decade-and-a-half.

Phrased another way: What’s the opportunity cost of this equity-building? His strategy is ridiculously simple, yet effective. He “benchmarked” the 1890 prices at a value of 100 and tracked relative housing costs through the lens of inflation-adjusted dollars. In March 2009, the Dow Jones (a measure of the largest U. Obvious disclaimer: This example is for illustrative purposes only. This example is meant to illustrate that homeownership is not the slam-dunk golden ticket that society likes to believe.It dances on the edge of the razor blade, but the balance tips in favor of ‘buy.’ So anyway – Now that I’ve given you some homework, let’s circle back to the justification that launched this conversation: ends. ) Here’s the smarter question that you should ask yourself: Will it be cheaper in the long-term to maintain a home or keep paying rent? Equity is created in three ways: Imagine that you sell junk on Craigslist. This is called “principal reduction.” You’re trading cash for equity. You’re an excellent manager, and you oversee a hyper-profitable renovation. Your answer is going to depend on a You get the picture.You’ll be making house payments until the day you die. The answer is influenced by: At this point, we’ve tackled two of the three misguided justifications for the cliché that “renting is throwing your money away.” #1: Rent is an expense. Every dollar that you spend on principal reduction carries an . Your home is now worth ,000 more, even though you only made a ,000 investment. Half this added value came from trading-cash-for-equity. My goal is to impress upon you — once and for all — that this myth that “renting is throwing money away” is wrongheaded. It oversimplifies a life-changing, six-figure decision. It’s probably caused thousands (or millions) of people to buy houses they later regret. The next time you hear a friend or family member repeat one of these cliches — — send them this article. Most of it, particularly during the first 15 years of your loan.

In other words, the “ITI” is money that you’re (also) “throwing away.” How much of your monthly payment is consumed by ITI?

A quick glance at the numbers makes that abundantly clear. Owners do.” Here’s the argument, broken down: Let’s dissect this argument.



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